I got two appraisals, “Why don’t they agree?”

This question has come up so many times in the recent few months, and of course it is not a new question, but I have decided to blog about it because in truth the question has merits. In a perfect world, where people all live in homogeneous neighborhoods with no adverse influences, no functional obsolescence, two cars in every garage and 2.5 kids, ok that might be pushing it, there may be instances where you can find two appraisers that if the saw the property at the same time on the same day they might agree on the value of a home.  – ok if you are wondering how you determine 2.5 kids, I once asked my dad this question. He explained that when you are working on the farm, one boy is a boy, two boys is half a boy, and three boys is no boy at all. So using this math I figure 2.5 kids must mean 2 girls, and 2 boys – but I digress.

Remember a real estate appraisal is an opinion of value. The opinion, by law, must be reasonable and based upon techniques and principles that are well accepted and known within the industry. But at the end of the day, it is simply an opinion. When data is abundant and there are several recent closed sales of homes that are identical, then the opinion of value should be shaped by the proximate, recent sale. As the degree of uncertainty increases as to how the recent sales actual compare to the subject this is where a matter of opinion can come into play.

Still, back in the day, relocation companies use to order three appraisals. They expected the three appraisers to come within 7-percent of each other and the closest two shaped the purchase price. Then when the relocation company sold the property they expected the appraisals to be within 2-percent of the final sale price. My point is that even though appraiser‘s rarely agree on everything, the market still should dictate the final opinion of value; therefore, the opinions should be relatively close together.

See you around the water Cooler!

UncleZev

 

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